Tag Archives: Cider

Grafting: Apples and Pears, 2014

Sometimes things go “almost” exactly as planned

DSC_0026These cuttings were taken from an apple tree of the variety “Duchess of Oldenburg” last winter, and grafted onto semi-dwarfing rootstock in the spring.

Blossoms on grafted cuttings are very unusual in the first year.  Usually a grafted tree will grow a stem in the first year, branches in the second year, then blossom and bear fruit in year three or four.  I’m not sure what happened here, but it makes for a curious photograph.

Most of the other 40 apples and 5 pear trees I grafted this year have a more conventional appearance.  That is, they are either alive or dead.  Below, scion-wood from the apple variety “Akane” was double whip-and-tongue grafted onto M9 rootstock.

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The whip-and-tongue graft has been quite successful for me.  A strong union is formed over the first year, allowing the grower to handle the young trees (re-potting, planting etc) without worrying about breaking the graft.  Below, this “King of Tompkins County” apple is pictured one year after grafting, with the paraffin tape removed.

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About 80% of this spring’s grafts were successful.  That leaves me with plenty of trees, but sadly missing some of the varieties I had hoped to cultivate.  Perhaps a trade is in order…next spring I will have yearling apple trees available (all my varieties are good) if anyone can provide me with cider apple and perry-pear scion wood.

Cheers!